Year 3 Homework

06 November 2015

Posted on Friday 06 November 2015 by Mr McKeon

Our homework this week is practice makes perfect. In English this week, we’ve been focussing on our own targets for writing and your child’s homework reflects that target. Your child has got one task to do, depending on their group.

To accurately spell high frequency words

This group have been looking at spelling rules and ways to practise their spellings. Their homework is to Look, Cover, Write, Check a group of high frequency words. Once they have practised these, they need to use them in sentences to describe fireworks.

To use ‘middlers’ effectively

‘Middlers’, which can be used to add extra information, are a type of subordinate clause. They’re placed in the middle of a sentence and are usually punctuated with commas either side. (Did you spot the middler in the first sentence?!) This group have to punctuate a group of sentences and then write their own sentences with middlers. When your child has completed this task, ask them if their sentence would make sense if the middler was removed – if it doesn’t, they’ll need to rewrite it.

To choose adjectives for impact

This group have been discussing how to use adjectives effectively. In their writing, they’re using an impressive range of adjectives but these adjectives do not always match the noun they are describing (I drank a colossal glass of water would usually not work as well as I drank a full glass of water).

To help with this, we’ve used target grids in class to rank adjectives for different purposes. On the grid, the best possible adjectives go in the middle and less effective adjectives are placed further away. Your child has a group of adjectives that describe fireworks and must rank them using this grid. They must then use the best adjectives to describe some fireworks.

To use a wider range of conjunctions

For this target, pupils have worked on expanding the types of conjunctions they use in their writing. A conjunction is used to join two words/sentences together to form one idea/sentence. We describe this as a ‘strong join’ in class. The homework for this group is about the choice of conjunction. They’ve been given similar sentences in groups of three that must be completed with either but, and or so. The challenge is to make sure that all three sentences make sense.

To punctuate sentences

This group are focussing on using capital letters and full stops to punctuate sentences. I have given the group pairs of sentences that have been ‘squashed together’ – children must decide where one sentence finishes and the next starts.

It’s half-term…

Posted on Saturday 24 October 2015 by Mr Roundtree

…so there is no homework this week.

Please make sure your child spends some time most days reading – books, comics, newspapers… Why not visit the library or a book shop this week?

To support writing, your child should review their spellings from the last few weeks. You could test them on words from all the lists, and ask them to use the words in sentences or a story, or create a comic strip with a word used in each speech bubble.Perhaps you could set a challenge (for you as well as your child!) of using spelling words in everyday conversations! Practising handwriting by joining up is a useful activity, too.

In Maths, children in Key Stage 2 should definitely practise times tables – including the related division facts. Can your child respond within five seconds (not counting up to work it out) to questions like ‘What’s 7 times 8?’ and ‘What’s 42 divided by 6?’

Of course, make sure your child is happy and healthy over half-term, too! A walk and play at Roundhay Park, a bike ride, a conker challenge, a trip to the art gallery… Enjoy!

16 October 2015

Posted on Friday 16 October 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is creative and is due Wednesday 21 October:

I can research a country. 

As part of our Holidays Big Topic, we’re about to compare a European beach destination with a UK beach destination – Scarborough. To help with our learning in school, it’d be useful for your child to research a part of Greece (could be a Greek island) and show their findings in a creative way.

Research ideas could cover a wide range of areas:

  • What’s the weather like in Greece?
  • Where is Greece?
  • What currency do they use in Greece?
  • How can people travel to Greece?
  • When is the best time to visit Greece?
  • What are Greek people like?
  • What traditions does Greece have?

After previous creative homeworks, Mr McKeon and I are excitedly looking forward to how creative Year 3 and 4 can be this time!

09 October 2015

Posted on Friday 09 October 2015 by Mr McKeon

This week’s homework is creative and is due in on Wednesday 14 October.

I can create a promotional image of Scarborough.

Over the past two weeks, we’ve been learning about promotions and how language is used to persuade people to buy something or visit somewhere. On Friday, we finished off this English focus with an extended piece of writing. Next week, we will be improving and displaying our promotional texts so we need some images to go with these. You could create a post card, a web page or even just illustrate one of the many attractions Scarborough has to offer.

02 October 2015

Posted on Friday 02 October 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week the homework is talk time and is due Wednesday 07 October:

Does everyone have the right to a holiday?

This question will encourage your child to think morally with regards to ‘rights’. Possible questions you may choose to pose might be:

  • what is a right?
  • what type of people are included in ‘everyone’?
  • can someone earn the right to a holiday?

Be sure to challenge your child’s thinking – using ‘because‘ is a great way to begin explaining their thoughts.

We’ll be sharing our ideas and opinions next week during our homework review.

Please see below for guidance on talktime homework requirements:

The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around children’s current learning. Children shouldn’t spend a lot of time on the presentation of the Talk Time homework. Instead, children should make notes, which will act as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week. For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class. We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time. Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child. (Please don’t forget we also want your comments in homework Books about the Talk Time and how your child has contributed to discussions.)

25 September 2015

Posted on Thursday 24 September 2015 by Mr McKeon

Our homework this week is a practice makes perfect. Pupils must fill in the missing gaps on a hundred square and use this to help them solve addition questions. We’ve been learning to use partitioning to help us solve addition questions in class. Asking your child to partition the smaller number will give them a starting point to solving the calculation. “How many steps of ten do you need to make?” and “How many steps of one do you need to make?” will match the language we have used in class when helping your child.

Look at the Addition video (especially Addition 6) for help with partitioning.

This homework is due on Wednesday 30 September.

18 September 2015

Posted on Friday 18 September 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is creative and is due Wednesday 23 September:

I can show what I know about Queen Elizabeth II.

As this week has seen the end of our mini-topic about Queen Elizabeth II, it’s a good opportunity for your child to reflect on all that they’ve learnt about Britain’s longest reigning monarch. Possible creative ideas could range from:

  • a fact quiz
  • a chronological timeline
  • a diary entry from the queen herself
  • a royal family tree
  • pros and cons about having a Royal Family

We’ll be looking for creative ideas as well as finesse next week in our homework review.

Please see below for guidance on creative homework requirements:

Creative

This is where your child’s creative juices can flow!  Creative homework is an opportunity for your child to choose whatever they want to demonstrate some learning.  For example, I can show what I know about food chains.  Your child could present all their learning in so many different ways, from a diagram with notes to a story or comic strip.  Parents’ and carers’ role is to support, encourage, help but (obviously) never to take over and do the homework!  Teachers always look forward to seeing how creative children can be.  If you notice the work has not been marked, please don’t worry.  Teachers will have looked at and celebrated the homework in another way – the work might have been viewed by the whole class using a visualiser which allows the work to be projected to the whole class and a discussion of ‘stars and steps’ will happen.  Peer assessment is also effective – children are very able to share what’s good and what needs improving!  These sorts of verbal feedback strategies are often more effective than a written comment because it’s more instant and it makes sure the child understands – and their work is praised publicly! (If you’d like to add a comment about the homework and how your child went about it, please do: teachers would welcome this.)

 

11 September 2015

Posted on Thursday 10 September 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week, the homework is talk time and is due Wednesday 16 September:

I know how to make my year a successful one.

This homework links to our SEAL theme of ‘New Beginnings’. The homework aims to encourage your child to think about their year in ahead in a new year group. Some things to make their school year successful might range from weekly spelling and times table scores, a positive learning attitude or being more responsible for their belongings.

Have a go at including some of the following questions in your discussion:

  • What makes a successful year?
  • What can you do to be successful at school?
  • How does it feel when you make positive choices?

We’ll be sharing our ideas next week during our homework review.

Please see below for guidance on talktime homework requirements:

The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around children’s current learning. Children shouldn’t spend a lot of time on the presentation of the Talk Time homework. Instead, children should make notes, which will act as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week. For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class. We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time. Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child. (Please don’t forget we also want your comments in homework Books about the Talk Time and how your child has contributed to discussions.)

10 July 2015

Posted on Thursday 09 July 2015 by Mrs Taylor

This week’s whole school homework involves completing the pupil health questionnaire sent home with your child.

 I can share my views about health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This annual questionnaire has been compiled in consultation with our school council and helps us to find out pupil views on some of our key health issues at school. Please support your child to complete the health questionnaire by discussing these issues.  The questionnaire should be returned to your class teacher by Wednesday 15 July.

03 July 2015

Posted on Friday 03 July 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week the homework is creative and is due Wednesday 08 July:

I can show what I know about light.

We’ve been thinking about light during science lessons this week – where it comes from, what creates a shadow and if it can travel through opaque, translucent and transparent materials.

Encourage your child to explore their house looking for sources of light, find their shadows and investigate what things are opaque, translucent and transparent. Ideas for homework could be:

  • a picture which shows a shadow
  • a diagram showing how their shadow changes through0ut the day
  • a collage of objects which are opaque, translucent or transparent.