Year 4 Homework

08 November 2013

Posted on Friday 08 November 2013 by Mr Wilks

The homework this week is practice makes perfect and it’s due in on Wednesday 13 November.

To plan a narrative (story) from any genre using ‘OBDER’.

This homework fits in with our literacy learning this week. We have been learning about the types (genre) of story and talking about which ones we prefer. Here’s a list of some of our favourite genres of story:

  • scary/horror
  • fantasy
  • adventure
  • love
  • familiar setting
  • fairy tale
  • humorous

This week, children have to plan a story from a genre of their choice. They have to use OBDER to plan the story. Your child should be able to tell you what OBDER is and how they should plan their story. However, just in case…

We use OBDER to sequence the events in the story:

  • O is for opening
  • B is for build-up
  • D is for dilemma
  • E is for events
  • R is for resolution

We have taught the children to start the plan with the dilemma so that they know where the story is heading. Once they have decided the dilemma, they can then go back to the opening and work through the rest of the sections in order.  Remember, the children aren’t expected to write the story, they are just planning it so each section should just have the main ideas about what will happen and possibly some ambitious vocabulary they want to use in each section or how the character is feeling. We also use DAD to help us when we are planning stories – ask your child about DAD!

 

It’s half-term…

Posted on Saturday 26 October 2013 by Mr Roundtree

…so no specific homework, spellings or tables this week.  It’s a good time to relax and enjoy some time with your children – have you visited the free exhibition of Anthony Browne pictures at Leeds City Museum, for example?

18 October 2013

Posted on Friday 18 October 2013 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is Practice Makes Perfect. During the past two weeks we have been focussing upon multiplication and division in our maths learning. The homework requires your child to multiply and/or divide to answer the questions.

Below are the guidance notes taken from the school’s Homework Policy for Practice Makes Perfect homework:

Practice Makes Perfect

This is similar to what you might consider traditional homework:
it may be a worksheet or a writing task (such as Y5′s current homework: I can write instructions).  Practice Makes Perfect is useful homework when something has been taught in school but needs consolidation.  The work should be fairly straightforward for the child as there should be no need for new learning, so just some encouragement from you is needed. However, it would be a great time to get your child to teach you – they should be able to explain the key points or processes!  We use this type of homework less often because usually the best practice is where a teacher can keep feeding back and presenting new challenges when they see it as appropriate.  Teachers mark these activities in line with our marking policy.

11 October 2013

Posted on Friday 11 October 2013 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is Talk Time and is due in on Wednesday 16 October 2013:

To talk to a member of my family about the house they grew up in.

This is a great opportunity for your child to learn the differences between their upbringing and another family member’s.  Topics of conversation may vary, but could include:

  • location
  • type of house
  • the domestic set-up of the house

Below are the guidance notes taken from the school’s Homework Policy for Talk Time homework:

Talk Time

Teachers have noticed that, in some instances, a lot of time has been taken on the presentation of the Talk Time homework.  Children are welcome to do this although it is not necessary.  The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around their current learning. Any notes made in their homework book should simply be there to aid them as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week.  For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class.  We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time.  Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child.

04 October 2013

Posted on Friday 04 October 2013 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is Practice Makes Perfect: to identify 2D and 3D shapes in the home. It is due in on Wednesday 09 October 2013.

Throughout the week, we have been learning about shapes and investigating their properties. To support and consolidate your child’s learning, they should explore their surroundings and show what they have learnt – this could be photographs, sketches, a table, Venn diagram or Carroll diagram.

Below are the guidance notes taken from the school’s Homework Policy for Practice Makes Perfect homework:

Practice Makes Perfect

This is similar to what you might consider traditional homework:
it may be a worksheet or a writing task (such as Y5’s current homework: I can write instructions).  Practice Makes Perfect is useful homework when something has been taught in school but needs consolidation.  The work should be fairly straightforward for the child as there should be no need for new learning, so just some encouragement from you is needed.  However, it would be a great time to get your child to teach you – they should be able to explain the key points or processes!  We use this type of homework less often because usually the best practice is where a teacher can keep feeding back and presenting new challenges when they see it as appropriate.  Teachers mark these activities in line with our marking policy.

27 September 2013

Posted on Saturday 28 September 2013 by Mrs Valentine

This week the homework is creative: I can show what I know about 2D shapes.

Next week we will be investigating shapes and learning all about their properties by way of ‘LADS’ (which stands for Lines, Angles, Diagonals and Symmetry). Your child may choose to complete their homework by using these prompts in a creative way.

Ideas could range from annotated drawings, photographs, collages, a PowerPoint presentation… anything!

Below are the guidance notes taken from the school’s Homework Policy for Creative homework:

This is where your child’s creative juices can flow!  Creative homework is an opportunity for your child to choose whatever they want to demonstrate some learning.  For example, the Y3 and Y4 homework this week is Creative: I can show what I know about food chains.  Your child could present all their learning in so many different ways, from a diagram with notes to a story or comic strip. Parents’ and carers’ role is to support, encourage, help but (obviously)
never to take over and do the homework! 

Teachers always look forward to seeing how creative children can be.  If you notice the work has not been marked, please don’t worry.  Teachers will have looked at and celebrated the homework in another way – the work might have been viewed by the whole class using a visualiser which allows the work to be projected to the whole class and a discussion of ‘stars and steps’ will happen.  Peer assessment is also effective – children are very able to share what’s good and what needs improving!  These sorts of verbal feedback strategies are often more effective than a written comment because it’s more instant and it makes sure the child understands (and their work is praised publicly!).

20 September 2013

Posted on Friday 20 September 2013 by Mr Wilks

The home work this week is talk time and is due in on Wednesday 25 September.

What makes a house a home?

You should explore the important things which make a house a home. Is it material things like the furnishings or the size of the house? Is it the location of the house? Is it the people who live in the house? Is it a combination of all these things?

Below are the guidance notes taken from the school’s Homework Policy for Talk Time homework:

Talk Time

Teachers have noticed that, in some instances, a lot of time has been taken on the presentation of the Talk Time homework. Children are welcome to do this although it is not necessary. The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around their current learning. Any notes made in their homework book should simply be there to aid them as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week. For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class. We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time. Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child.

 

 

13 September 2013

Posted on Saturday 14 September 2013 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is creative and is due in on Wednesday 18 September.

I can show what my dream house would look like.

This week will see the start of our Big Topic: ‘Our House‘. The creative homework is a great opportunity for your child to demonstrate their imagination and flair designing their dream house! They could:

  • write a detailed description
  • produce a collage using a range of materials/photographs
  • draw a bird’s eye plan
  • construct a 3D house using fold-outs
  • sketch a detailed drawing and label it

…or anything else they can think of!

Below are the guidance notes taken from the school’s Homework Policy for Creative homework:

This is where your child’s creative juices can flow!  Creative homework is an opportunity for your child to choose whatever they want to demonstrate some learning.  For example, the Y3 and Y4 homework this week is Creative: I can show what I know about food chains.  Your child could present all their learning in so many different ways, from a diagram with notes to a story or comic strip. Parents’ and carers’ role is to support, encourage, help but (obviously)
never to take over and do the homework! 

Teachers always look forward to seeing how creative children can be.  If you notice the work has not been marked, please don’t worry.  Teachers will have looked at and celebrated the homework in another way – the work might have been viewed by the whole class using a visualiser which allows the work to be projected to the whole class and a discussion of ‘stars and steps’ will happen.  Peer assessment is also effective – children are very able to share what’s good and what needs improving!  These sorts of verbal feedback strategies are often more effective than a written comment because it’s more instant and it makes sure the child understands (and their work is praised publicly!).

 

06 September 2013

Posted on Friday 06 September 2013 by Mr Wilks

The home work this week is Talk Time and is due in on Wednesday 11 September.

I can talk about what I’m going to do at home and at school to make sure I have a successful year.

Below are the guidance notes taken from the school’s Homework Policy for Talk Time homework:

Talk Time

Teachers have noticed that, in some instances, a lot of time has been taken on the presentation of the Talk Time homework. Children are welcome to do this although it is not necessary. The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around their current learning. Any notes made in their homework book should simply be there to aid them as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week. For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class. We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time. Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child.

 

05 July 2013

Posted on Thursday 04 July 2013 by Mrs Burke

This week, your child has been taking part in a variety of activities as part of our Community Themed Week. One of these activities involved learning facts about different countries.

This week’s homework is creative. It is due in on Wednesday 10 July 2013.

I can show what I know about a country I have a connection with.

They could:

  • produce a spider diagram of information
  • draw pictures with labels
  • write a fact file
  • create a promotional leaflet for a tourism brochure
  • design a homepage for a website about the country

…or think of another creative way of presenting their information.

This homework can be about any country of their choice, but it would be ideal if there is some sort of connection. This could be where your child was born, or where their family originate from; it could be where they have visited on holiday or even where they plan to visit in the future – any sort of connection would be good!