Year 5 Spelling

06 January 2012

Posted on Friday 06 January 2012 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all to do with adding ‘ing’.

We’ve tried to learn this rule already this year, but this revisit is aimed at addressing a few misconceptions that remain. Some words in English need you to ‘double up for ing’ to make a short vowel sound (like the a in batting). Some have that short vowel sound, but don’t need you to double up because the previous two letters are consonants (like wafting). Some have a long vowel sound and need you to ‘drop the e for ing’, like when you change smile to smiling. Children need to learn when to do each of these rules, so this week should remind them!

Children will only be tested on the ing words, but should understand where that word comes from in order to understand the spelling rules, which are more important than the words themselves.

The class has also been asked to find two more words of their own that don’t double up for ing and two that do.

Base word

ing

jump

jumping

waft

wafting

slide

sliding

wipe

wiping

snatch

snatching

nag

nagging

brag

bragging

rot

rotting

slip

slipping

cunning

09 December 2011

Posted on Friday 09 December 2011 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all homophones – words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. In recent discussions about children’s writing with Mr Roundtree, both Mrs Hazell and Mr Owen found homophones to be an issue for most writers, regardless of ability – so we all have the same ones! Children should definitely practise these ones in sentences to make sure that they’re using them correctly.

Homophones

This week, we’re all looking at words that sound the same but are spelt differently: homophones.

there

their                                 they’re

your

you’re

plain

plane

which

witch

are

our

02 November 2011

Posted on Friday 02 December 2011 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are again all to do with the rule – ‘Drop the y for an i

This time, we’re considering how words ending in ‘y’ change when used in the past tense as well as other changes. Children will find their spellings easier to learn if they learn the ‘root’ word, such as carry, then remember how to change each root, rather than learning the spelling of each word separately.

Drop the ‘y’ for an ‘i’ (A)

This week, we’re learning how to change words that end in a y to make other related words.

verb

ing

past

noun

supply

supplying

supplied

supplier

ally

allying

allied

alliance

try

trying

trying

trial

vary

varying

varied

variety



Drop the ‘y’ for an ‘i’ (B)

This week, we’re learning how to change words that end in a y to make other related words.

verb

ing

past

noun

reply

replying

replied

supplier

carry

carrying

carried

carrier

try

trying

trying

trial

vary

varying

varied

variety


Drop the ‘y’ for an ‘i’ (C)

This week, we’re learning how to change words that end in a y to make other related words. High frequency words at the bottom.

verb

ing

past

noun

reply

replying

replied

supplier

 

carry

carrying

carried

carrier

 

try

trying

trying

trier

 

 

high frequency

 

watch

thought

always

question

 

25 November 2011

Posted on Monday 28 November 2011 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all to do with changing words that end in y. We change words ending in y to make other related words, often changing them to an i instead: drop the ‘y’ for an ‘i’.

Drop the ‘y’ for an ‘i’ (A)

This week, we’re learning how to change words that end in a y to make other related words.

adjective

‘more’

‘most’

adverb

hungry

hungrier

hungriest

hungrily

pretty

prettier

prettiest

prettily

windy

windier

windiest


heavy

heavier

heaviest

heavily


Drop the ‘y’ for an ‘i’ (B)

This week, we’re learning how to change words that end in a y to make other related words.

adjective

‘more’

‘most’

adverb

hungry

hungrier

hungriest

hungrily

pretty

prettier

prettiest

prettily

windy

windier

windiest


heavy

heavier

heaviest

heavily


Drop the ‘y’ for an ‘i’ (C)

This week, we’re learning how to change words that end in a y to make other related words. High frequency words at the bottom.

adjective

‘more’

‘most’

adverb

hungry

hungrier

hungriest

hungrily

 

pretty

prettier

prettiest

prettily

 

heavy

heavier

heaviest

heavily

 

 

high frequency

 

made

laugh

every

probably

very

18 November 2011

Posted on Thursday 17 November 2011 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all connectives – words that join two sentences together. Using these words makes children’s writing a lot more interesting and complex and as such is a writing target for most of the class.

Children should practise using them in sentences – this week’s homework is designed to make this easier. Once children have discussed verbally, they should practise writing some of the connectives in sentences too.

Connectives – A

This week’s spellings are all connectives – words that can join two sentences together. The words in bold are what the words under them mean. Sometimes you can swap them directly but sometimes you’ll need to change the order of a sentence to make them make sense.

so

and

but

because

consequently

furthermore

however

as a result of

therefore

moreover

nevertheless

due to

hence

additionally

although

 


Connectives – B

This week’s spellings are all connectives – words that can join two sentences together. The words in bold are what the words under them mean. Sometimes you can swap them directly but sometimes you’ll need to change the order of a sentence to make them make sense.

so

and

but

because

consequently

furthermore

however

as a result of

therefore

also

yet

due to

hence

additionally

although

 


Connectives – C

This week’s spellings are all connectives – words that can join two sentences together. The words in bold are what the words under them mean. Sometimes you can swap them directly but sometimes you’ll need to change the order of a sentence to make them make sense.

so

and

but

because

therefore

additionally

however

as a result of

hence

also

yet

due to

 

 

although

 

High Frequency

a lot

almost

called

caught

11 November 2011

Posted on Thursday 10 November 2011 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all words with Ancient Greek prefixes – parts of words that start others. There are loads in English! They help us to understand what unfamiliar words mean.

Here are the ones that are in our spellings:

  • pan – all
  • mono – one, single, alone
  • auto – self, same
  • bio – life, living
  • geo – earth
  • anti – opposite, opposing
  • therm – heat
  • demo – people
  • photo – light
  • hyper – too much
  • micro – small
  • tele – far, end
  • semi – half
  • tri – three


Greek prefixes (A)

This week, we’re learning about words that have an Ancient Greek prefix.

panorama

autobiography

antidote

hyperactive

monochrome

thermal

geography

democracy


Greek prefixes (B)

This week, we’re learning about words that have an Ancient Greek prefix.

telephone

autobiography

antidote

biology

photograph

semicircle

geography

microscope


Greek prefixes (C)

This week, we’re learning about words that have an Ancient Greek prefix.

telephone

triangle

geography

automatic

photograph

semicircle

biology

microscope

High Frequency Words

break

take

wait

pain

It’s the holiday…

Posted on Sunday 23 October 2011 by Mr Roundtree

…so there are no homework or spellings.

However, there are lots of ways you can support you child’s learning, first and foremost by visiting our Help Your Child section.

There are lots of things to do in or near Leeds, from geo-caching on Monday to a spooky Halloween walk on Sunday.  Here are a few other ideas to fill the October half-term holiday with activities…

  • take your child for an autumnal walk in Roundhay Park to collect chestnuts for a game of conkers or autumn leaves for an autumn collage;
  • on a cold, autumn day, stay indoors and spend time baking (What unit of measurement will we use to weigh? If we want to make twice as much, how much will we need? When will the food be ready?);
  • take a trip to Leeds Art Gallery – the Damien Hirst exhibition should prove a great opportunity for lots of discussion, description and possibly disagreement!
  • and, as always, enjoy some relaxing reading (why not read some Tintin stories from a local library in preparation for the forthcoming film?)

School re-opens on Tuesday 01 November 2011 (following a training day on Monday 31 October 2011).

04 Novemeber 2011

Posted on Thursday 20 October 2011 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are to do with common strings of letters that sound different depending on the word.

For example: ‘ight’ sounds different in ‘night’ to how it does in ‘weight’.

Some sentences you might think about at home are:

  • I had an After-Eight mint from the freight train at twilight and now I’m worried about putting on a slight bit of weight.
  • My niece found a piece of shield and gave it to her friend on the pier.

Common letter strings (A)

We are learning about words that have the same letters inside but sound different.

ight

ie

slight

pier

eight

piece

twilight

niece

weight

friend

freight

shield


Common letter strings (B)

We are learning about words that have the same letters inside but sound different.

ight

ie

light

pie

eight

piece

night

field

weight

friend

height

shield


Common letter strings (C)

We are learning about words that have the same letters inside but sound different. We’re also practising spelling frequently used words.

ight

frequently used words

light

went

eight

when

night

where

weight

were

height

what

14 October 2011

Posted on Friday 14 October 2011 by Mr Owen

This week’s spelling are all wow words again. Children should learn what they mean, if they don’t know, then practise using them in sentences.

Wow words (A and B)

This week’s spellings are all impressive words to use. We sometimes call them ‘wow words’.

troublesome (Y6 have different)

horrendous

courageous

thunderous

gullible

cautious

enormous

timid

rumour (Y6 have different)

blistering


Wow words (C)

This week’s spellings are all impressive words to use. We sometimes call them ‘wow words’.The last four are high frequency words, as usual.

terrible

blistering

horrible

scorching

lovely

enormous

awful

whisper

gigantic

dangerous

friend

said

walk

large

07 October 2011

Posted on Friday 07 October 2011 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all impressive words. We often call them ‘wow words’.

Try using them in sentences!

Wow words (A)

This week’s spellings are all impressive words to use. We sometimes call them ‘wow words’.

enchanted

mesmerize

exhilarating

insignificant

ambitious

succulent

luscious

tantalising

spontaneous

gingerly


Wow words (B)

This week’s spellings are all impressive words to use. We sometimes call them ‘wow words’.

enchanted

luscious

noble

gingerly

triumphant

peculiar

precious

mystical

torrential

enchanted


Wow words (C)

This week’s spellings are all impressive words to use. We sometimes call them ‘wow words’. The last four are high frequency words, as usual.

snarl

mystical

saliva

luscious

noble

torrential

unusual

ancient

beast

dazzling

laugh

thought

tough

cough