Year 5 Spelling

07 January 2011

Posted on Friday 07 January 2011 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all to do with alternatives to the work said.

All of the verbs below can replace ‘said’.  Using said can become repetitive, so it’s a good idea to have a variety of other words handy. 

As usual, children will be asked to use one of these words in a sentence (this time a speech sentence!).  Children know if they are group A, B or C.

Said words (A)

 

interrupted 

interjected 

conceded

answered

wondered

explained

stuttered

whispered

murmured

sneered

Said words (B)

 

agreed

shouted

screamed

gasped

exclaimed

asked

replied

snapped

cried

sighed

Said words (C)

High frequency words on the right:

said

tomorrow

asked

below

cried

borrow

replied

house

shouted

answer

Holidays approaching…

Posted on Friday 10 December 2010 by Mr Roundtree

…so there are no spelling lists, tables or other homework this week.

Enjoy reading, writing (and possibly making?) Christmas cards, reflecting on this term’s topics and other activities.

03 December 2010

Posted on Thursday 02 December 2010 by Mr Owen

Wow! I can’t believe it’s December already.

This week’s spellings are again to do with common strings of letters that might sound different depending on the word that they’re in. Children have been assigned group A, B or C spellings, which are designed to meet their needs more specifically.

We’re concentrating on the ‘ough’ string as well as ‘our’.

I will be asking for one of the words to be written in a sentence. The examples below have more than one word in each sentence, but it’s just to give an idea of how you could revise the spellings quickly!

  • I’ve ploughed through enough tough soil.
  • I heard a rumour from your neighbour that you have a new colour armour.

Common letter strings (A)

We are learning about words that have the same letters inside but sound different.

ough

our

plough

armour

enough

favour

though

honour

through

rumour

tough

neighbour

Common letter strings (B)

We are learning about words that have the same letters inside but sound different.

ough

our

plough

armour

enough

favour

though

colour

through

pour

tough

your

Common letter strings (C)

We are learning about words that have the same letters inside but sound different.

ough

frequently used words

though

your

through

you’re

enough

should

cough

would

tough

could

Friday 26 November

Posted on Friday 26 November 2010 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are to do with common strings of letters that sound different depending on the word.

For example: ‘ight’ sounds different in ‘night’ to how it does in ‘weight’.

I’m trying something new this week – three spelling groups. Each child will be given an initial spelling group, A, B or C, though this may change. This is aimed to address the individual needs of different children.

Children will be asked to write one or two of their spelling words in sentences, so should rehearse this at home (with correct punctuation, too!).

Some possible sentences you might think about at home are:

  • I had an After-Eight mint from the freight train at twilight and now I’m worried about putting on a slight bit of weight.
  • My niece found a piece of shield and gave it to her friend on the pier.

Common letter strings (A)

We are learning about words that have the same letters inside but sound different.

ight

ie

slight

pier

eight

piece

twilight

niece

weight

friend

freight

shield


Common letter strings (B)

We are learning about words that have the same letters inside but sound different.

ight

ie

light

pie

eight

piece

night

field

weight

friend

height

shield


Common letter strings (C)

We are learning about words that have the same letters inside but sound different. We’re also revising the spelling of frequently used words.

ight

frequently used words

light

went

eight

when

night

where

weight

were

height

what

Friday 19 November

Posted on Thursday 18 November 2010 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings continue to involve adding ‘…ing’.

We’re concentrating on two rules:

  • drop an e before adding ‘ing’
  • just add ‘ing’ if the word has a long vowel sound before the end consonant, or ends in a y

As usual, the last five words in bold are for children learning fifteen. Base words don’t need to be learnt – they’re just for reference so that you can see whether you need to drop an e or just add ‘ing’.

Some examples in sentences:

  • Taking a hiding from Mr Owen on Victorian day would have been worse if he’d been a real Victorian teacher.
  • I heard the microwave beeping but saw my disgusting food was burning.
  • I was feeling caring this morning.

base word

ing

beep

beeping

burn

burning

disgust

disgusting

feel

feeling

carry

carrying

care

caring

hope

hoping

ride

riding

hide

hiding

take

taking

judge

judging

create

creating

return

returning

train

training

glow

glowing









12 November 2010

Posted on Thursday 11 November 2010 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all to do with adding ing. This is a vital part of spelling and has some important rules to learn in order to spell reliably.

This week’s all involve doubling the last consonant before adding ing.

As usual, the last 5 (in bold italics) are only for those learning 15! Learn the right hand list only. The left hand one is just to see the base word that you’re adding ing to.

hop

hopping

beg

begging

drop

dropping

swim

swimming

win

winning

run

running

hum

humming

mop

mopping

fit

fitting

stop

stopping

dig

digging

drag

dragging

hug

hugging

shop

shopping

nip

nipping








Try learning spellings in sentences such as:

“I was dragging myself to Tesco to do some shopping when I noticed a crab nipping a man fitting a pipe. “

“I was winning the swimming race, but stopping to improve my humming  was a mistake.

05 November 2010

Posted on Monday 08 November 2010 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all connectives. These are words that join two parts of a sentence together or help structure a piece of writing.

For example:

  • I played football and scored twice.
  • He went to the shop because he needed some more bread.
  • She took the dog for a walk, although they didn’t go far.
  • In addition, Moortown Primary is famous for its happy and healthy learners.

The spellings in bold are the additional words for children that normally learn 15 spellings. This week they will be learning slightly more than 15 because some of the spellings are easier than previous weeks (words like yet and moreover). The connectives have been grouped according to whether the word is used instead of and, but or because or whether it is used to to structure a report, in which case it is a time connective.

time

and

but

because

as before

in addition

although

therefore

firstly

also

however

due to

finally

additionally

yet

owing to

moreover

nevertheless

as a result

furthermore

consequently

15 October 2010

Posted on Friday 15 October 2010 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings all start with a prefix and will be tested on Thursday 21 October (the last day of half term!).

All of the prefixes originate from Latin or Ancient Greek. For example, ‘auto’ means ‘self’ and ‘bi’ means ‘two’ or ‘twice’. You might be able to spot similar words in other European languages.

The first 10 spellings (in bold) are for everyone and the last 5 are for adjectives and adverbs unless your child has been told otherwise.

  • autograph
  • bicycle
  • telephone
  • telegraph
  • television
  • transport
  • transparent
  • automatic
  • circle
  • transfer
  • autobiography
  • circumstance
  • bisect
  • telescope
  • transmit

Try writing spellings in a sentence such as “Please can I have your autograph, Mr Owen?” or “I hate watching cartoons on television!”

Practising spellings a little and often is usually the best way to make sure that they stay in your head, rather than just doing well on the test.

08 October 2010

Posted on Friday 08 October 2010 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are plurals again. This time we’re focusing on word endings that change from f to v when they are pluralised eg Mr Wilks may have one calf but I have three calves, and Mr Redfearn has one nice scarf but all of my scarves are even nicer.

The first 10 are for everyone. Adverb and Ajective groups should try to find 5 more of their own. Some of these will then be included in in the test on Friday 15 October.

  • calves
  • selves
  • thieves
  • halves
  • wolves
  • knives
  • loaves
  • lives
  • scarves
  • wives

01 October 2010

Posted on Tuesday 05 October 2010 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all common words that are regularly spelt incorrectly. They will be tested on Friday 08 October.

The last five are for Adjective and Adverb groups only, unless your child has been told otherwise.

  • where
  • when
  • what
  • everywhere
  • busy
  • tired
  • please
  • wait
  • late
  • probably
  • speak
  • speech
  • example
  • excessive
  • extremely