Year 5 Spelling

04 October 2013

Posted on Friday 04 October 2013 by Mrs O'Malley

Children know if they’re in group A or B for spellings this week. They’ll be tested on Friday 11 October.

Homophones (A)

This week’s spellings are all words that sound the same but have
different spellings (homophones). When you’re learning these, ask someone at
home to test you by creating a ‘fill the missing gap’ sentence. For example:
‘What’s that over ……….?’ (their/they’re/there).

you’re

sun

piece

break

your

son

peace

brake

there

reign

sent

road

they’re

rain

cent

rowed

their

rein

scent

rode

beach

waste

week

meet

beech

waist

weak

meat

Can you think of any more?

 

Homophones (B)

This week’s spellings are all words that sound the same but have
different spellings (homophones). When you’re learning these, ask someone at
home to test you by creating a ‘fill the missing gap’ sentence. For example:
‘What’s that over ……….?’ (their/they’re/there).

you’re

sun

piece

break

your

son

peace

brake

there

to

bye

road

they’re

too

by

rowed

their

two

buy

rode

board

some

week

meet

bored

sum

weak

meat

Can you think of any more?

 

 

27 September 2013

Posted on Friday 27 September 2013 by Mr Owen

Greek prefixes (A)

This week, we’re learning about words that have an Ancient Greek prefix. A prefix is the chunk of letters at the start of a word. If you understand what the prefix means, you’ll be able to make a good guess at the meaning of lots of other words – so make sure you learn them! Children could also find other words with the same prefix.

panorama

autobiography

antidote

hyperactive

monochrome

thermal

geography

democracy

 

Greek prefixes (B)

This week, we’re learning about words that have an Ancient Greek prefix. A prefix is the chunk of letters at the start of a word. If you understand what the prefix means, you’ll be able to make a good guess at the meaning of lots of other words – so make sure you learn them! Children could also find other words with the same prefix. Learning the common words is really important – don’t forget the i in family and that dangerous doesn’t have an e on the end!

telephone

triangle

geography

automatic

photograph

semicircle

biology

microscope

Common Words

family

throw

heard

dangerous

20 September 2013

Posted on Friday 20 September 2013 by Mrs O'Malley

Children know if they’re in group A or B for spellings this week. They’ll be tested on Friday 27 September.

Drop the y for an i (A)

This week’s spellings are all words that normally end in a y, but have been changed into related words by ‘dropping the y for an i’.

adjective

comparative

superlative

lofty

loftier

loftiest

broody

broodier

broodiest

moody

moodier

moodiest

naughty

naughtier

naughtiest

lovely

lovelier

loveliest

silly

sillier

silliest

stealthy

stealthier

stealthiest

steady

steadier

steadiest

 

Drop the y for an i (B)

This week’s spellings are all words that normally end in a y, but have been changed into related words by ‘dropping the y for an i’.

adjective

comparative

superlative

moody

moodier

moodiest

naughty

naughtier

naughtiest

lovely

lovelier

loveliest

silly

sillier

silliest

stealthy

stealthier

stealthiest

steady

steadier

steadiest

13 September 2013

Posted on Friday 13 September 2013 by Mr Owen

Again, children know if they’re in group A or B for spellings this week. They’ll be tested on Friday 20 September.

Doubling up for a short vowel sound – adding ing (A)

This week’s spellings are all words that need you to double the last consonant before adding ing. They make the vowel sound short.  Some of them are quite unusual! If you’re not sure, find out what they mean. We need to be able to use them in sentences.

lug – lugging

lag – lagging

wrap – wrapping

jet – jetting

plot – plotting

pit – pitting

plod – plodding

man – manning

sag – sagging

whet – whetting

 

Doubling up for a short vowel sound – adding ing (B)

This week’s spellings are all words that need you to double the last consonant before adding ing. They make the vowel sound short.  The left word of each pair is just a ‘root’ word so you can see where the ing word comes from. Learn the ings only! We need to be able to use them in sentences.

hop – hopping

beg – begging

win – winning

swim – swimming

plot – plotting

shop – shopping

plod – plodding

run – running

stop – stopping

sag – sagging

06 September 2013

Posted on Friday 06 September 2013 by Mr Owen

Children have been put into two groups: either A or B. This will change over the year, depending on children’s individual needs.

Drop the e for ing (A)

This week’s spellings are all words which follow one of our three main spelling rules: ‘drop the e for ing’. Don’t forget to try and think of some your own!

coping

confiding mistaking concentrating piercing
blaming receiving exploding inflating

dividing

 

 

Drop the e for ing (B)

This week’s spellings are all words which follow one of our three main spelling rules: ‘drop the e for ing’.
Don’t forget to try and think of some your own!

waking

shaking mistaking coping changing
framing writing exploding sliding

dividing

05 July 2013

Posted on Friday 05 July 2013 by Mr Owen

This week’s spellings are all plurals again. This time, they’re all words which need you to add es to make them plural. Year 5 chose most of them!

  1. apexes
  2. addresses
  3. bosses
  4. complexes
  5. empresses
  6. glasses
  7. masses
  8. watches
  9. benches
  10. blotches

28 June 2013

Posted on Friday 28 June 2013 by Mr Owen

Plurals

This week’s spellings are all plurals that need to change an f to a v. For example, you have one scarf but many scarves. Can you come up with more of your own? We’ve learnt about plurals before but mistakes are still being made!

calves

knives

selves

loaves

thieves

lives

halves

scarves

wolves

wives

21 June 2013

Posted on Friday 21 June 2013 by Mr Owen

Comparatives and superlatives

In literacy lessons, we’re learning about promotional writing. This week’s spellings will help! They’re all comparatives or superlatives – words which show a comparison or mean ‘the best’ or ‘most’ something. Do they follow any of our main spelling rules?

busier

crazier

hottest

biggest

funnier

lovelier

tastiest

fastest

14 June 2013

Posted on Friday 14 June 2013 by Mr Owen

Negation 2

This week’s spellings are all words that have been changed to mean the opposite of what they did originally. Some negatives begin with dis, im or ir – these prefixes are used this week.

encourage – discourage

mobile – immobile

agree – disagree

pure – impure

 respect –  disrespect

responsible – irresponsible

advantage – disadvantage

regular – irregular

approve – disapprove

resistible – irresistible

 

Alternatively, some children may have these spellings:

  1. friendly
  2. slowly
  3. quickly
  4. loudly
  5. quietly
  6. rapidly
  7. cautiously
  8. carefully

07 June 2013

Posted on Sunday 09 June 2013 by Mr Owen

Negation

This week’s spellings are all words that have been changed to mean the opposite of what they did originally. Most words that are negatives begin with un, il and im – these prefixes are used this week.

kindness – unkindness

packed – unpacked

happiness – unhappiness

legal – illegal

likely – unlikely

possible – impossible

natural – unnatural

moveable – immoveable

patient – impatient

mortal – immortal