Year 4 Homework

11 December 2015

Posted on Friday 11 December 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is practice makes perfect and is due Wednesday 16 December:

I know how to use inverted commas correctly.

Your child is required to show their knowledge of how inverted commas (speech marks ” “) are used by completing the challenges they’ve been given.

Support your child by checking that:

  • spoken words are included inside inverted commas
  • inverted commas are written as ‘mini 11s’ as opposed to ’66’ and ’99’
  • capital letters are used at the beginning of inverted commas
  • new lines are used for a new speaker

We’ll be reviewing this next week during an English lesson and it’ll help inform my judgement of your child’s knowledge of number 16 of the writing Year 4 ARE (age-related expectations).

 

04 December 2015

Posted on Thursday 03 December 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is talk time and is due Wednesday 09 December:

How can the 8 Rs help me to learn?

This question links to our SEAL theme this half term. We’ve spent time thinking about the 8 Rs for learning:

  • resilience
  • resourcefulness
  • readiness
  • responsiveness
  • reflection
  • risk-taking
  • remembrance
  • responsibility

Be sure to discuss with your child about how these 8 Rs best work for them and their learning. Is there one particular R that they use more frequently than others? Which R is the trickiest to use? What R helps them to know themselves better?

We’ll review this homework during our SEAL session next week.

Please see below for guidance on talk time homework requirements:

The purpose of talk time homework is to encourage a conversation around children’s current learning. Children shouldn’t spend a lot of time on the presentation of the Talk Time homework. Instead, children should make notes, which will act as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week. For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class. We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time. Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child. (Please don’t forget we also want your comments in homework Books about the Talk Time and how your child has contributed to discussions.)

 

 

27 November 2015

Posted on Thursday 26 November 2015 by Mrs Taylor

Following our Health themed week, this week, our whole school homework is creative and is due on Wednesday 02 December.

I make healthy choices.

Each class has taken part in a variety of learning this week including a range of visitors to support our teaching of keeping healthy (please see our Class News pages).

Your child could present this creative homework in a variety of different ways:

  • a quiz which tests the knowledge of other children
  • art work
  • poetry
  • a poster
  • writing: diary, story, letter, instructions, report
  • a rap
  • a mindmap
  • your own creative idea

We look forward to seeing your creative ideas to demonstrate how to keep healthy and this homework will be the focus of our open afternoon, next week.

Homework open afternoon, 2.40pm on Wednesday 02 December – parents/carers of children in Years 1 – 6 are invited into the classroom to help you to be aware of the standards of homework in your child’s class; it will also give you an insight into how we give feedback to your child even if the homework does not appear to be marked.

 

20 November 2015

Posted on Thursday 19 November 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is practice makes perfect and is due Wednesday 25 November:

I can put into practice what I have learnt in maths.

Over the past few weeks, we’ve been learning all about multiplication, specifically points 17, 18 and 20 detailed in the Year 4 age-related expectations (ARE). Your child has been given some multiplication challenges which they’re required to complete. In addition, an extra challenge has been included to allow for a little creativity in their maths learning.

Try going through the calculations with your child:

  • challenge them to explain how they reached a certain answer
  • get your child to teach you something they’ve learned from their homework
  • test your child to silently teach you
  • encourage your child to justify why they reached their answer and not another answer

As always, please ask if you’ve any questions or concerns.

Please see below for guidance on practice makes perfect homework:

Practice Makes Perfect

This is similar to what you might consider traditional homework: it may be a worksheet or a writing task. Practice Makes Perfect is useful homework when something has been taught in school but needs consolidation.  The work should be fairly straightforward for the child as there should be no need for new learning, so just some encouragement from you is needed.  However, it would be a great time to get your child to teach you – they should be able to explain the key points or processes!  We use this type of homework less often because usually the best practice is where a teacher can keep feeding back and presenting new challenges when they see it as appropriate. Teachers mark these activities in line with our marking policy.

13 November 2015

Posted on Friday 13 November 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is talk time and is due Wednesday 18 November:

How can I respond if I see bullying?

Next week, is national anti-bullying week. Our SEAL statement, I am responsive, will encourage your child to talk about being bullied or to respond if they witness bullying.

Our school definition of bullying has recently been reviewed by the School Council and remains the same: ‘Bullying is when you hurt someone, physically or emotionally, several times on purpose.’ Throughout the week, we’ll be thinking about bullying – the different types and what we can do to stamp it out.

We’ll review this homework during our SEAL session next week.

Please see below for guidance on talk time homework requirements:

The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around children’s current learning. Children shouldn’t spend a lot of time on the presentation of the Talk Time homework. Instead, children should make notes, which will act as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week. For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class. We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time. Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child. (Please don’t forget we also want your comments in homework Books about the Talk Time and how your child has contributed to discussions.)

06 November 2015

Posted on Thursday 05 November 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is creative and is due Wednesday 11 November:

I can design my own mythical being.

As our Big Topic, Holidays, has taken us to Greece, we’ve been learning all about Greek myths. The children are really enjoying learning stories from another culture. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be writing our own Greek myths so designing our own mythical beings to write about is appropriate.

Your child has been given some prompts to help them imagine their own mythical being. Take a look with your child to see how creative they can be!

I know this class always go ‘all out’ when it comes to creative homeworks and I’ve got a feeling this will be the best yet! I can’t wait.

Please see below for guidance on creative homework requirements:

Creative

This is where your child’s creative juices can flow!  Creative homework is an opportunity for your child to choose whatever they want to demonstrate some learning.  For example, I can show what I know about food chains.  Your child could present all their learning in so many different ways, from a diagram with notes to a story or comic strip.  Parents’ and carers’ role is to support, encourage, help but (obviously) never to take over and do the homework!  Teachers always look forward to seeing how creative children can be.  If you notice the work has not been marked, please don’t worry.  Teachers will have looked at and celebrated the homework in another way – the work might have been viewed by the whole class using a visualiser which allows the work to be projected to the whole class and a discussion of ‘stars and steps’ will happen.  Peer assessment is also effective – children are very able to share what’s good and what needs improving!  These sorts of verbal feedback strategies are often more effective than a written comment because it’s more instant and it makes sure the child understands – and their work is praised publicly! (If you’d like to add a comment about the homework and how your child went about it, please do: teachers would welcome this.)

It’s half-term…

Posted on Saturday 24 October 2015 by Mr Roundtree

…so there is no homework this week.

Please make sure your child spends some time most days reading – books, comics, newspapers… Why not visit the library or a book shop this week?

To support writing, your child should review their spellings from the last few weeks. You could test them on words from all the lists, and ask them to use the words in sentences or a story, or create a comic strip with a word used in each speech bubble.Perhaps you could set a challenge (for you as well as your child!) of using spelling words in everyday conversations! Practising handwriting by joining up is a useful activity, too.

In Maths, children in Key Stage 2 should definitely practise times tables – including the related division facts. Can your child respond within five seconds (not counting up to work it out) to questions like ‘What’s 7 times 8?’ and ‘What’s 42 divided by 6?’

Of course, make sure your child is happy and healthy over half-term, too! A walk and play at Roundhay Park, a bike ride, a conker challenge, a trip to the art gallery… Enjoy!

16 October 2015

Posted on Friday 16 October 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is creative and is due Wednesday 21 October:

I can research a country. 

As part of our Holidays Big Topic, we’re about to compare a European beach destination with a UK beach destination – Scarborough. To help with our learning in school, it’d be useful for your child to research a part of Greece (could be a Greek island) and show their findings in a creative way.

Research ideas could cover a wide range of areas:

  • What’s the weather like in Greece?
  • Where is Greece?
  • What currency do they use in Greece?
  • How can people travel to Greece?
  • When is the best time to visit Greece?
  • What are Greek people like?
  • What traditions does Greece have?

After previous creative homeworks, Mr McKeon and I are excitedly looking forward to how creative Year 3 and 4 can be this time!

09 October 2015

Posted on Friday 09 October 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is talktime and is due Wednesday 14 October:

I know how to make my classroom a good place to learn.

This homework is next week’s SEAL statement. This discussion is especially important when thinking about our own classroom environment and what we can all contribute to make it a happy, healthy and purposeful place to learn.

Possible questions may range from:

  • What does a good place to learn look like?
  • What does a good place to learn sound like?
  • What can I do to make our classroom look and sound like a good place to learn?

We’ll be reviewing this homework during our SEAL session next week.

Please see below for guidance on talktime homework requirements:

The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around children’s current learning. Children shouldn’t spend a lot of time on the presentation of the Talk Time homework. Instead, children should make notes, which will act as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week. For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class. We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time. Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child. (Please don’t forget we also want your comments in homework Books about the Talk Time and how your child has contributed to discussions.)

02 October 2015

Posted on Friday 02 October 2015 by Mrs Valentine

This week the homework is talk time and is due Wednesday 07 October:

Does everyone have the right to a holiday?

This question will encourage your child to think morally with regards to ‘rights’. Possible questions you may choose to pose might be:

  • what is a right?
  • what type of people are included in ‘everyone’?
  • can someone earn the right to a holiday?

Be sure to challenge your child’s thinking – using ‘because‘ is a great way to begin explaining their thoughts.

We’ll be sharing our ideas and opinions next week during our homework review.

Please see below for guidance on talktime homework requirements:

The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around children’s current learning. Children shouldn’t spend a lot of time on the presentation of the Talk Time homework. Instead, children should make notes, which will act as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week. For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class. We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time. Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child. (Please don’t forget we also want your comments in homework Books about the Talk Time and how your child has contributed to discussions.)