Year 4 Homework

28 November 2014

Posted on Friday 28 November 2014 by Mrs Valentine

The homework this week is practice makes perfect and is due Wednesday 03 December:

I can write a recount about our chemistry lesson at Allerton Grange.

We had such a fantastic time learning about science at Allerton Grange on Thursday, that I couldn’t let our homework pass without writing about our spectacular visit! In your child’s homework book is a visual prompt to help them write about what we got up to during our lesson. Things to consider:

  • Recounts are usually in the form of a letter, postcard, diary entry.
  • Events need to be written in chronological order.
  • Time connectives are a great way to open sentences.
  • Feelings and mood are important to help the reader understand the emotions of the writer – using descriptive adjectives does this too!

Here’s the prompt your child has been given – happy recounting!

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Practice Makes Perfect

This is similar to what you might consider traditional homework: it may be a worksheet or a writing task (such as Y5′s current homework: I can write instructions).  Practice Makes Perfect is useful homework when something has been taught in school but needs consolidation.  The work should be fairly straightforward for the child as there should be no need for new learning, so just some encouragement from you is needed.  However, it would be a great time to get your child to teach you – they should be able to explain the key points or processes!  We use this type of homework less often because usually the best practice is where a teacher can keep feeding back and presenting new challenges when they see it as appropriate.  Teachers mark these activities in line with our marking policy. 

21 November 2014

Posted on Thursday 20 November 2014 by Mrs Taylor

Following our Healthy Bodies, Healthy Minds themed week, our whole school creative homework this week is:

I know how to have a healthy body and healthy mind.

Each class has taken part in a variety of learning this week including a range of visitors to support our teaching of keeping healthy bodies and healthy minds.  These include physical activities such as karate, tai chi, tennis, Leeds United football, assemblies by Leeds Rhinos and Leeds anti-social behaviour unit, class talks by Heart Research UK, d:side (drug education), various parents with health-related jobs and visits to Tesco for their Farm to Fork scheme and Allerton Grange.  Class-based learning has also included dental health, hand-washing, the importance of sleep and breakfast, healthy eating and food preparation and mental health.

Your child could present this creative homework in a variety of different ways:

  • a quiz which tests the knowledge of other children
  • art work
  • poetry
  • a poster
  • writing: diary, story, letter, instructions, report
  • a rap
  • a mindmap
  • your own creative idea

We look forward to seeing your creative ideas to demonstrate how to keep a healthy body and healthy mind.

Please return this homework by Wednesday 26 November.

14 November 2014

Posted on Friday 14 November 2014 by Mrs Valentine

The homework this week is Talk Time and is due Wednesday 19 November:

I know how to be responsible.

Discussions with your child may centre around being responsible at home as well as school. How can your child show that they are responsible? What would they expect to see when someone is responsible?

Please indicate that you’ve supported your child with their Talk Time homework by signing against the notes your child has written in their homework book.

Below is the guidance for Talk Time homework, taken from our Homework Policy:

The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around children’s current learning. Children shouldn’t spend a lot of time on the presentation of the Talk Time homework.  Instead, children should make notes, which will act as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week.  For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class.  We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time.  Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child.

 

07 November 2014

Posted on Friday 07 November 2014 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is practice makes perfect and is due Wednesday 12 November:

I can show what I know about time.

Throughout the week, our maths learning has been about time. We’ve learnt to tell the time, read the time using a timetable, converted time (analogue to digital/24-hour clock) and calculated duration.

Your child is required to complete a booklet which allows them to practise their time skills.

Time is a tricky concept for children to pick up and so it needs regular revisiting. Here are some good questions you could pose in order to support your child’s learning:

  • “What time is it?”
  • “What time will it be in 15/20/25 etc minutes time?”
  • “If our car journey starts at 11:30 and we arrive at 13:15, how long has our journey been?”

It’s half-term…

Posted on Thursday 23 October 2014 by Mr Roundtree

…so there’s no specific homework this week, apart from ensuring your child spends at least 20 minutes each day reading and 5-10 minutes learning their number bonds / times tables.

Enjoy your October break. If you stay in Leeds, check out all the activities the museums and art galleries have on offer.

17 October 2014

Posted on Thursday 16 October 2014 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is creative and is due Wednesday 22 October:

I can show what I’ve learnt about shapes.

This week in maths, we’ve been learning all about shapes and their properties. We’ve spent time investigating the amount of lines, types of lines (parallel/perpendicular), different types of triangles (equilateral, isosceles, scalene) and types of angles (acute, right, obtuse, reflex). As you can see – we’ve been super busy!

Your child could present this creative homework in a variety of different ways:

  • a quiz which tests the knowledge of other children
  • a song/rap telling the audience all they know about shape
  • annotated photographs of shapes they can find around their house

Enjoy being creative!

 

10 October 2014

Posted on Friday 10 October 2014 by Mrs Valentine

This week’s homework is Talk Time and is due Wednesday 15 October:

How can I make my classroom a good place to learn?

This task links to our SEAL statement for the week. Discuss with your child about their behaviour, attitude and respecting the learning environment so that everyone in the class is able to learn to the best of their ability.

Please indicate that you’ve supported your child with their Talk Time homework by signing against the notes your child has written in their homework book.

Below is the guidance for Talk Time homework, taken from our Homework Policy:

Talk Time

The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around children’s current learning. Children shouldn’t spend a lot of time on the presentation of the Talk Time homework.  Instead, children should make notes, which will act as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week.  For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class.  We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time.  Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child.

03 October 2014

Posted on Thursday 02 October 2014 by Mrs Valentine

The homework this week is practice makes perfect and is due Wednesday 08 October:

To multiply using a method.

This week in maths, we’ve learnt to multiply two 2-digit numbers using a method.

For example: 35 x 26

1. Draw a grid.

2. Partition both numbers.

3. Multiply (diagonally).

4. Add the numbers.

5. Check the answer.

 

 

 

Your child has been given numbers to multiply and some context (word) problems to solve. Feel free to pop in if I can help in anyway!

 

 

26 September 2014

Posted on Thursday 25 September 2014 by Mrs Valentine

The homework this week is practice makes perfect and is due Wednesday 01 October:

I can show what I’ve learnt about mass.

This week, we’ve learnt about measuring mass (weight).

We’ve learnt about estimating and using benchmarks – things we know the weight of to determine things which are heavier or lighter.  We’ve learnt to convert units, mainly grams (g) into kilograms (kg), used decimals and practised how to read a scale.

Don’t forget that you can support your child in other ways, too.  As well as completing the homework, try challenging your child to estimate and measure accurately the mass of things around your home (or even you…!).  Even something as simple as looking for the weight of things in the kitchen cupboard and at the supermarket will help by helping to secure awareness of how much 150g or 30g or 1kg actually is.  And it’s fine to sometimes use Imperial measures, but try to get used to metric, too!

19 September 2014

Posted on Friday 19 September 2014 by Mrs Valentine

The homework this week is Talk Time and is due Wednesday 24 September:

LO: Should everyone be responsible for recycling? Why?

This homework centres upon our class novel: Stig of the Dump. Stig’s dump is a trove of treasures he has recycled and re-invented. The theme of recycling and reusing in the book has led to some discussion within class. For the homework, children are to explore this in more depth and talk about our responsibilities when it comes to recycling.

Please indicate that you’ve supported your child with their Talk Time homework by signing against the notes your child has written in their homework book.

Below is the guidance for Talk Time homework, taken from our Homework Policy:

Talk Time

The purpose of Talk Time homework is to encourage a conversation around children’s current learning. Children shouldn’t spend a lot of time on the presentation of the Talk Time homework.  Instead, children should make notes, which will act as a prompt when it is discussed in class the following week.  For this reason, teachers tend to give verbal feedback during their talk time session in class.  We want our children to be expert talkers, using a variety of sentences and expressions, and able to back up their points or disagree with others in a polite way – this is more important than written notes for Talk Time.  Simply: it’s hard to be a good writer if you’re not a good speaker, so Talk Times using ambitious words, useful phrases, interesting sentences is the best way to support your child.