Year 2 Class News

Upcoming sporting events

Posted on Saturday 10 May 2014 by Mrs Taylor

Sports & Active Lifestyles Fair

Find out what sports clubs and physical activity opportunities are available in our area for all children, young people and adults.  This is a great opportunity to come as a family or with friends and take part in sport / activity taster sessions and watch sports demonstrations from local clubs.

  • When: Thursday 5th June 2014
  • Time: 5:30pm – 7:30pm
  • Where: Roundhay School

Roundhay Park Family Fun Run (1K & 5K)

  • When: Saturday 7th June 2014
  • Time: 10:00am
  • Where: Roundhay Park

Tour de Roundhay

REAP and Roundhay Live are starting the celebrations of Le Grand Depart early with this community event, full of family fun, music, food and cycling.

  • When: Sunday 22nd June 2014
  • Time: 12:00pm-5:00pm
  • Where: Roundhay School

For further information about any of these events please ask at the school office.

Owls in Moortown Primary

Posted on Friday 09 May 2014 by Mr Roundtree

As part of our nocturnal animals mini topic, we had some nocturnal visitors in the first week back after Easter. Five different owls came to see us and we even got to hold them! Two barn owls, two eagle owls and a snowy owl took to the stage and we learnt all about them. Here are some things we found out.

  • Owls have two ears; one on top of their head and one on the bottom. This is so they can hear prey and know if something is above trying to catch them.
  • Owls create a nest in stones on the ground so that their eggs won’t roll away.
  • There are five types of owl in Britain; these are the barn owl, long-eared owl, short-eared owl, tawny owl and the little owl.
  • Amazingly, owls can turn their heads 270 degrees! This helps because they can’t move their eyes side to side like we can.
Each of us had a go at holding Jack the barn owl and we’ve taken a picture home so that we can keep it. Even Miss Rushbrooke had a go!

Our new SEAL theme for this half-term is…

Posted on Saturday 19 April 2014 by Mrs Taylor

…’Relationships’.

We begin the half term with a focus on mannersI cover my mouth (when I cough, sneeze or yawn) is our statement for this weekChildren, and adults, will be taught the ‘vampire method’ for coughs and sneezes in order to prevent the spread of germs – ‘use your sleeve to cough and sneeze’.

Following this, the Relationships theme explores feelings within the context of our important relationships including family and friends.

It aims to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in three key social and emotional aspects of learning: self-awareness, managing feelings and empathy.

There is a focus throughout the theme on helping children understand the feelings associated with an experience that we all need to cope with at some time: that of loss – whether of a favourite possession, a friend, a family home, or a loved one. Although relatively few children are bereaved, most will experience losses of other kinds during their childhood; losing a home, losing friends because of moving house or changing schools, or losing a pet are examples.

We would therefore ask for parents / carers to alert us to any experiences your child has had that might make this area particularly difficult for them – for example, a bereavement.

Sorting Smarties

Posted on Monday 07 April 2014 by Mr Roundtree

As it was the last day before Easter, and we had been looking at presenting and interpreting data, we had some fun with chocolate in maths! We had a look at a bar chart showing us what colour Smarties were in one tube. Each pair of children had a tube of Smarties and we needed to know which tube the chart was showing us.

We decided to pour our Smarties out and sort them into the different colours.

We then thought of a way to better organise our Smarties so that we could compare the packet to the chart more quickly. We created a pictogram of Smarties on our whiteboards.

Finally, we created our own bar chart of the information to find out whose packet matched the chart we first looked at. Shockingly, it didn’t match anybody’s and Miss Rushbrooke had to own up to eating that pack of Smarties already! So… we all ate ours too. Yum!

 

 

It’s the Easter holidays…

Posted on Friday 04 April 2014 by Mr Roundtree

…so we have no set homework or spellings, in line with our Homework Policy.

That doesn’t mean we expect your child not to be developing their skills in reading, writing and maths!

Your child should be reading daily – this could be fiction, factual books, a comic or newspaper, and could include being read to at bedtime, too.

It would be good to practise basic skills in writing by writing a letter or email to a relative, perhaps recounting a day-trip or reviewing a film your child watched.

We’re finding quite a few children are ‘squashing their sentences’ such as I went to Leeds City Museum it was really interesting which is wrong.  It would be much better with punctuation to separate or a word to join:

  • I went to Leeds City Museum. It was really interesting. (A comma isn’t strong enough to separate two sentences.)
  • I went to Leeds City Museum – it was really interesting.
  • I went to Leeds City Museum; it was really interesting.
  • I went to Leeds City Museum and it was really interesting.
  • I went to Leeds City Museum which was really interesting.

Finally, to improve calculation skills, please keep practising mental number facts which your child must know:

  • number bonds (two numbers which add up to 10, 20 and 100 eg 3+7, 13+7, 30+70) – these facts should be known by children in Y1 – Y2
  • times tables (up to 12×12) and the division facts with your child – children in Y2 should have rapid recall of x2, x 5 and x 10 at least

We know we mention these ‘basics’ a lot, but that’s because they involve practice, practice and more practice – we practise a lot at school, but your child will need to practise at home, too, if they are to truly succeed.

Learn more about current expectations for reading, writing and maths.  However, do be aware that a new National Curriculum comes into effect from September, meaning these expectations have been raised and so many aspects of learning now feature in younger age groups.

Have you always wanted to be a superhero?

Posted on Monday 31 March 2014 by Mrs Weekes

Have you always wanted to be a superhero?

Do you know what your super power would be?

Go to Moor Allerton Library on Tuesday 27 May from 2.30 – 3.30 pm and meet an author, Jason Beresford.  Discover the adventures of the Fabulous Fish Finger gang.

This is a free event, no booking required.

Solving problems in maths

Posted on Sunday 16 March 2014 by Mr Roundtree

When I returned from Finland, it was clear that Mr Wilks had taught us well in multiplication. I set the children a challenge using grid method. I gave them all of the numbers but not yet placed in their section of the grid. In groups, they had to figure out what went where and then tell me what my calculation was.

Everybody rose to the challenge, working very effectively in teams. Well done!

Sporting heroes

Posted on Sunday 16 March 2014 by Mr Roundtree

So far in our heroes topic, we have explored superheroes, heroes from the past and community heroes. This week, our focus has been on heroes in sport. We were lucky enough to be visited by Keith Senior, a retired Leeds Rhinos player. Lots of us had some very interesting questions.

How long have you been playing rugby? 20 years.
Why did you retire? I got a knee injury.
Have you ever got cuts and bruises? Yes lots!

Health heroes

Posted on Wednesday 12 March 2014 by Mrs Taylor

This weekend, 15 and 16 March, at Eureka, there is a very topical health heroes Dragon’s Den event…

Meet some of the most important health heroes of the past at our humorous, playful and interactive Dragon’s Den style sessions.

  • Why Florence Nightingale was the original ‘forces sweetheart’?
  • Did Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin by accident?
  • Why should we thank Louis Pasteur for healthy milk on our cereal?

Who’ll win your backing? You decide!

 

 

 

Going on an adventure!

Posted on Monday 10 February 2014 by Mr Roundtree

In literacy, we are looking at scripts. Each group has got their own script with a different adventure. Today, we looked at the setting description at the beginning and got ourselves into our starting positions.

 

Arctic Adventure

ALL THE ESKIMOS ARE TRAVELLING ON A SLEDGE WITH DOGS PULLING THEM. IT IS VERY COLD.

Antarctic Adventure

ALL THE EXPLORERS ARE STANDING IN THE COLD ON THE SOUTH POLE, LOOKING A BIT CONFUSED.

Indian Adventure

A GROUP OF CHILDREN ARE ON A SCHOOL TRIP NEAR THE INDIAN OCEAN. IT IS VERY HOT.

Pacific Adventure

FISHERMEN ARE STUCK ON AN ISLAND IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN. IT IS VERY HOT AND THEY ARE ALL SITTING UNDER A TREE FOR SHADE.

Atlantic Adventure

ON A BOAT SAILING FROM ENGLAND TO AMERICA BUT THERE IS A BIG STORM THAT IS GETTING STRONGER. THE SAILORS ARE SCARED.

We’re looking forward to practising and performing the rest of the scene while we learn about the features of a play script.